Armageddon?

Posted: March 18th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: The Right, the US and us, war | Tags: , , | Comments Off

The prospect of a right-wing narrow government starts to dwell on people. Foreign Policy‘s David Rothkopf sees WWIII on the horizon:

“First, the conflict will be political, potentially very intense and may well transform the U.S.-Israeli relationship. Later, the conflict may become military with the Israelis acting (alone or not) against the Iranians. The upside of the overall trend: the U.S. is perceived as more balanced in the region. The downside: the U.S.-Israel relationship is likely to weaken (I know some of you may see that as an upside)…oh, and also, possibly, nuclear Armageddon”

This is a bit hysterical, I think. When Iran will acquire the bomb (and I think it’s a “when” and not an “if”), Israel will just have to find a way to live with it: whether with the help of a defense treaty with the US, or simply by the power of its own nuclear deterrence (Israel is said to have second strike capabilities). An Iranian bomb won’t cause Israel to break with the US; quite the opposite: it will make Israel more dependent on America.


Israel and a Nuclear Iran

Posted: December 23rd, 2008 | Author: | Filed under: In the News, the US and us | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off

I just ran into an interesting post on Yossi Melman’s blog. Melman is Haaretz’s intelligence and secret services reporter. His blog [in Hebrew] deals with national security issues and bicycle riding.

In this post Melman lists some of the major mistakes by the Israeli intelligence agencies in recent years – like missing out completely on Hamas’ possible success in the elections, or the Hizbullah’s intentions in Lebanon.

Most of all, he deals with the intelligence assumption that Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction prior to The Second Gulf War. Unlike the US, says Melman, Israel never had a public debate on that error and its consequences.

But the nugget comes at the end. Following a mail from one of his readers, Melman has an interesting and disturbing observation:

“A military and financially strong Iraq was one of Israel’s strategic assets. Iraq and Iran kept maintaining their conflict, and none of them would have allowed the other side to get such an advantage that would put his sovereignty in danger. By encouraging the US invasion of Iraq, Israel has brought upon itself a nuclear Iran”